We look after our players!

Thread starter #1
Evan Mosey has been sent to a Pro Hockey Camp in the US to aid his recovery, and I know we have used Pro camps for other players in the past. How can the grumkins still complain about our management set up when we invest in our players so much.

I don’t know any other EIHL team that would stand by a player injured pre start of season for 10 months and send them off to training camps,

Yes gassing and changing sometimes has short term benefits but building up our players with a community of support is much more the club I want to follow!

I really think our ownership is ace, lets hope this is Mosey back on the 15th!
 

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Ocko

Well-Known Member
#2
I’m pretty sure he’s taken himself there as that is where he’s from and family still live. So I think he’s gone home to visit more then being sent there as part of recovery... also at the ‘pro camp’ are kids, so it’s probably just a drop in session.
 

jimmy snels

Well-Known Member
#3
either way im really glad evan is back on the ice!! could be a big plus before end of year to get him back.

really nice fella as well incidentally so glad he's starting to get there in his recovery
 

terry hunt

Well-Known Member
#4
My understanding from comments by Lordo that Mosey has been skating for while.
Also been said he is desperate to play.I bet he is trying hard to be available for the World Championship with GB.
ACL injuries are really serious for anyone let alone pro sportsmen.
 

moggy#9

Active Member
#5
My understanding from comments by Lordo that Mosey has been skating for while.
Also been said he is desperate to play.I bet he is trying hard to be available for the World Championship with GB.
ACL injuries are really serious for anyone let alone pro sportsmen.
While I'm sure he wants to get back to playing I'd rather him take his time and be fully recovered. If hate to see him have a recurrence.
 

Diablo3

Well-Known Member
#6
If we are realistic we will be lucky to get him for the playoffs or the start of next season. There is no way he will be fit for the Worlds even if he is on the ice. It takes a while to build up that match fitness. We have definitely missed him this year.
 

moggy#9

Active Member
#8
Really? Just out of curiosity, what do you base that on? Most of what I've read suggests 6 months to a year of recovery. I know next to nothing about such injuries, so it'd be nice to understand.
 

RTfarty

Active Member
#9
When did he have the operation? Recovery is around the 6-9 months mark. Assuming it was at the beginning of the season and there are no further complications/complexities, there's no reason he should miss any time next season.
 
#11
ACL injuries vary massively and to be competing in such a physical sport is a huge rehab program. Most of the ACL injuries I have treated are for footballers but and take anywhere from 3 to 12 months to be match fit.
 

Diablo3

Well-Known Member
#12
I've seen some footage of Evan on the ice, so here is hoping, but the recovery time for just an ACL is 9-12 months. That wasn't the only damage, he hurt his MCL too. However frustrated he is, there is no point rushing back and putting all that rehab in jeopardy. I'd rather have him fit on the ice in September.
 

Mazzoak

Active Member
#15
Before yo’all get to carried away.

OBJECTIVE:
To determine the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the National Hockey League (NHL) and to examine the effects of this injury on return-to-play status and performance.

DESIGN:
Case series; level of evidence, 4.

METHODS:
This was a 2-phase study. Phase I used the NHL electronic injury surveillance system and Athlete Health Management System to collect data on ACL injuries and man games lost over 10 seasons (2006/2007-2015/2016). Data collected in phase I were received in deidentified form. Phase II examined the performance impact of an ACL injury. Players were identified through publically available sources, and performance-related statistics were analyzed. Data collected in phase II were not linked to data collected in phase I. A paired t test was used to determine any difference in the matching variables between controls and cases in the preinjury time period. A General linear model (mixed) was used to determine the performance impact.

RESULTS:
Phase I: 67 ACL injuries occurred over 10 seasons. The incidence for all players was 0.42/1000 player game hours (forward, 0.61; defenseman, 0.32, goalie, 0.08) and by game exposure was 0.2/1000 player game exposures (forward, 0.33; defenseman, 0.11; goalie, 0.07). Forwards had a greater incidence rate of ACL tears with both game hours and game exposures when compared with defensemen and goalies (P < 0.001, <0.001; P = 0.008, <0.001, respectively). Phase II: 70 ACL tears (60 players) were identified. Compared with controls, players who suffered an ACL tear demonstrated a decrease in goals/season (P < 0.04), goals/game (P < 0.015), points/season (0.007), and points/game (0.001). Number of games and seasons played after an ACL injury did not differ compared with controls (P = 0.068, 0.122, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:
Anterior cruciate ligament injuries occur infrequently, as it relates to other hockey injuries. Despite a high return to play, the performance after an ACL injury demonstrated a decrease in points and goals per game and per season.
 

terry hunt

Well-Known Member
#17
Before yo’all get to carried away.

OBJECTIVE:
To determine the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the National Hockey League (NHL) and to examine the effects of this injury on return-to-play status and performance.

DESIGN:
Case series; level of evidence, 4.

METHODS:
This was a 2-phase study. Phase I used the NHL electronic injury surveillance system and Athlete Health Management System to collect data on ACL injuries and man games lost over 10 seasons (2006/2007-2015/2016). Data collected in phase I were received in deidentified form. Phase II examined the performance impact of an ACL injury. Players were identified through publically available sources, and performance-related statistics were analyzed. Data collected in phase II were not linked to data collected in phase I. A paired t test was used to determine any difference in the matching variables between controls and cases in the preinjury time period. A General linear model (mixed) was used to determine the performance impact.

RESULTS:
Phase I: 67 ACL injuries occurred over 10 seasons. The incidence for all players was 0.42/1000 player game hours (forward, 0.61; defenseman, 0.32, goalie, 0.08) and by game exposure was 0.2/1000 player game exposures (forward, 0.33; defenseman, 0.11; goalie, 0.07). Forwards had a greater incidence rate of ACL tears with both game hours and game exposures when compared with defensemen and goalies (P < 0.001, <0.001; P = 0.008, <0.001, respectively). Phase II: 70 ACL tears (60 players) were identified. Compared with controls, players who suffered an ACL tear demonstrated a decrease in goals/season (P < 0.04), goals/game (P < 0.015), points/season (0.007), and points/game (0.001). Number of games and seasons played after an ACL injury did not differ compared with controls (P = 0.068, 0.122, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:
Anterior cruciate ligament injuries occur infrequently, as it relates to other hockey injuries. Despite a high return to play, the performance after an ACL injury demonstrated a decrease in points and goals per game and per season.
There is lots of info on the Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins website if interested.I dont think posting the conclusions is a good idea.
Our league is way less demanding than the NHL so outcomes can be more positive.
 

Mazzoak

Active Member
#18
That’s true, flip that around, there is more specialist medical, rehab and ultimately money in the franchises to deal with these issues.

Its ultimately down to many factors, searching Google for answers to his injury is as useful as searching for your own medical solutions.
Even after all the physical treatment has completed, you’ve got a knee that’s never going to fully return to its original capabilities pre injury, add the psychological impact the pain experienced at the time of injury, the risks, etc all have this possicle impact on players, causing a change in that players performance. Knowing there is a risk of reoccurrence or impact on performance can make a player question his future.
Let’s hope he’s not Robby Fabbri.
 
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